facebook

Important Message from Boston Tea Party Ships. Read more. Also, Important Message on the Boston Old Town Trolley Tours during Red Sox games and events around stop 12. Read more.

Wednesday April 25th Very Busy- Public tours running every hour between 10:00 and 3:30. Waits may be longer than normal.
Friday, April 27th Public Tours every 45 mins between 10:00 am and 12:30. Guest may have a longer Morning wait.  Do not wait until the last tour at 5 pm to arrive.
On days there is a Game or other event at Fenway Park, Old Town Trolley Service to Stop # 12 (Fenway Park) will cease one hour before the start if the event and recommence 1/2 hour after the event starts. During and at the end of the Ball Game or event, we will monitor traffic at Fenway and at our discretion may suspend service to Stop #12
Guest are advised that Fenway is a relatively easy walk from Stop # 11, Dalton Street, during the time Stop # 12 is closed.
For Sunday, April 22nd – Old Town Trolley Tours of Boston will have changes to the regular route due to the annual Greek Independence Day Parade as well as the closure of the Longfellow Bridge for ongoing construction. Stops may be made out of order or reclocated due to detours. Please call the local office at 617-269-7150 option 1 for the most up to date information.
Stop # 13 will be in front of the Cambridge Marriot on Broadway.
logo-print
Skip to content

Kings Chapel & Burying Ground

5 Stop 5
1
boston kings chapel

Kings Chapel is a Christian Unitarian church located on Tremont and School Streets. The church was organized in 1686 as an Anglican Church. In 1785 it became the oldest member of the Unitarian Universalist Association and the first Anglican Church. Beside the church is the Kings Chapel Burying Ground, which was Boston’s only burial ground for 30 years. Many historical figures are buried here, including John Winthrop, the colony governor, William Dawes, who rode with Paul Revere on the Midnight Ride, Mary Chilton, the first woman off the Mayflower, and William Emerson, Ralph Waldo Emerson’s father. The original building was a wooden church built in 1688 and it was replaced by the current stone building in 1754. The bell was hung in 1772 and was recast by Paul Revere in 1814; it still rings at services today.

1
Up Up
Back to top
Online Chat