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Boston Attractions

boston mit museum

MIT Museum

13 Stop 13

The M.I.T. Museum is a window into the world of some of the latest and most exciting research at MIT. Visitors can explore over 150 years of education and research in the forefront of science, engineering, and technology. Located at 265 Massachusetts Avenue, the Museum presents an exciting array of exhibitions, covering everything from artificial intelligence and oceanography, to architecture, three-dimensional holograms, and the world’s largest collection of the much loved kinetic sculptures by Arthur Ganson.

Approximate Time to Allow: 2 hrs

boston JFK library museum

JFK Museum

Designed by I.M. Pei, the John F. Kennedy Library was dedicated by President Jimmy Carter and the Kennedy Family in 1979. Located on a ten acre park, the museum is dedicated to the life and legacy of the 35th president of the United States. The library also hosts the Profiles in Courage award, given annually to honor elected public officials.

gibson-house-museum

Gibson House Museum

7 Stop 7 (617) 267-6338

The Gibson House offers visitors a glimpse into 19th century living in Boston’s Back Bay. As one of the Back Bay’s first residences, the Gibson House was built in the mid-19th century and remains the unspoiled residence of a well-to-do Victorian Boston family. Kitchen, scullery, butler’s pantry, and baths, as well as formal rooms and personal quarters are filled with the Gibsons’ original furniture and personal possessions. Located on 137 Beacon Street, between Arlington and Berkeley Streets, Boston.

boston td garden

TD Garden

4 Stop 4

TD Garden is the home arena for the Boston Bruins of the National Hockey League and Boston Celtics of the National Basketball Association. TD Garden is owned by Delaware North, whose CEO, Jeremy Jacobs, also owns the Bruins. It is the site of the annual Beanpot college hockey tournament, and hosts the annual Hockey East Championships.

boston institute of contemporary art

Institute of Contemporary Art

19 Stop 19

Housed in a dazzling edifice, the Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) is a treasured centerpiece in Boston’s flourishing Fort Point Channel neighborhood. Featuring a glass-enclosed gallery space cantilevered over the Boston Harbor, the modern façade of the Institute provides an interesting contrast to the historic architectural designs prominent in the city’s skyline. The arrival of the museum in 2006 helped spur the artistic renaissance of this former warehouse district. The ICA sponsors a variety of dynamic permanent and rotating exhibits in its breathtaking waterfront setting.

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charles street

Beacon Hill / Antique Row

14 Stop 14

One of Boston’s oldest neighborhoods, Beacon Hill is known for its charming, narrow cobblestone streets, federal style row houses and gaslit street lamps. It’s also considered to be one of Boston’s most desirable and expensive residential areas in the city. A visit to Boston isn’t complete without a stop here. Whether to shop, dine or wander about admiring the architecture and numerous historic sites, there are so many things to do in Beacon Hill.

boston newbury street

Newbury Street

10 Stop 10

Eight blocks filled with salons, boutiques, and fabulous dining. Boston’s Newbury Street has something for everyone. Shops include The Boston Baked Bean, So Good Jewelry, Niketown, Hempest and more.

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boston old state souse

Old State House

5 Stop 5

The Old State House, built in 1713 on the site of the first Town House, is the oldest surviving public building in Boston. The building served as a meeting place for the exchange of economic and local news and was said to be the center of politics in the colonies. The Declaration of Independence was read from the balcony on the east side of the building, and just below it is the spot where the Boston Massacre took place. The Old State House is one of the most important public buildings in the U.S.

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Boston bunker hill monument

Bunker Hill Monument

3 Stop 3

The Bunker Hill Monument was the first public obelisk in the United States designed to commemorate the Battle of Bunker Hill. The battle was actually misnamed because the majority of the action took place on Breed’s Hill and that is where the monument sits. The monument was begun in 1827 but construction had to be halted and it wasn’t completed until 1843. The architect, Solomon Willard, had the granite for the 221 ft structure brought in from Quincy, Massachusetts.

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boston new england sports museum

New England Sports Museum

4 Stop 4

The New England Sports Museum is located on the 5th and 6th floors of the TD Garden. This Boston attraction features exhibits organized by sport, including hockey (Boston Bruins, Hartford Whalers, and Olympics), basketball (Boston Celtics), football (New England Patriots), and baseball (Boston Red Sox). Concourse galleries also feature boxing, rugby, soccer and artifacts from the Boston Marathon. The museum has life-size statues of Carl Yastrzemski, Bobby Orr, Larry Bird, and Harry Agganis, an old Boston Garden hockey penalty box, and thousands of other items.

boston convention center

Boston Convention Center

18 Stop 18

In June of 2004, the Boston Convention Center opened near the South Boston Harbor and Boston’s World Trade Center. Boston’s Convention Center is the largest in New England, offering 516,000 square feet of exhibit space, 300,000 square feet of function space, and a 40,020 square foot ballroom overlooking the city skyline and Boston Harbor. The space had originally been planned to house a stadium for the New England Patriots but concern over traffic prevented its construction.

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boston fort point channel

Fort Point Channel

17 Stop 17

The Channel extends from Gillette Headquarters, home to America’s premier razor manufacturer since King Gillette founded the company over 100 years ago, to the site of the Boston Tea Party on those very waters in 1773 and out into the Boston Harbor. In today’s Boston, the Fort Point Channel is bordered by restaurants, fabulous hotels and water view condos (look at the beautifully mirrored InterContinental Hotel and Residences), as well as attractions like the Children’s Museum and the recently rebuilt Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum.

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boston tea party ships museum

Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum

16 Stop 16

Located on the Congress Street Bridge, the Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum is an interactive, high tech, floating museum. Unlike anything you’ve ever experienced before, this unique museum sits on a barge in the water, includes tours on restored tea ships and a stunning, interactive documentary that immerses you into the events that led up to the American Revolution. Touch, feel, see and hear what the patriots felt when their passions and angers flared at the injustice of taxation without representation. Participate in multi-sensory exhibits, witness dramatic reenactments by professional actors and historians and discover the true story behind the Boston Tea Party.

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boston black heritage trail

Black Heritage Trail

15 Stop 15 open Mon-Sun

The Black Heritage Trail features various homes, memorials, and sites that are significant in the history of Boston’s 19th century African American community. The first slaves arrived in 1638 and by 1705 there were over 400. At this time there were also the beginnings of a free black community in the North End, and by 1790, the time of the first census, Massachusetts reported no slaves. The trail includes the Robert Gould Shaw & the 54th Regiment Memorial, first black regiment, the George Middleton House, the oldest home built by African Americans on Beacon Hill, and the Phillips School, one of Boston’s first schools with an interracial student body.

boston theater district

Boston Theater District

6 Stop 6

More than a dozen theaters are clustered in the Boston Theater District. On Warrenton Street or Shear Madness Alley, the Charles Playhouse is home to the Blue Man Group, as well as Shear Madness, the country’s longest running non-musical play. Other theaters include the Colonial, Shubert, Orpheum, Opera, Emerson Majestic & Wilbur, most of which were built in the grand architectural style of early 1900s performance halls. These beautifully restored Boston gems, some intimate, some grand, host critically acclaimed productions.

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boston chinatown

Chinatown

6 Stop 6

Chinatown in Boston is the only historic Chinatown in New England. The area first became populated by Chinese immigrants in the early 1890’s. Before that, the area was settled by White Anglo-Saxon Protestants. Irish, Jewish, Italian, and Syrian immigrants also all lived in the area at one time or another because of the low cost of housing and job opportunities in the area. In the late 19th century, manufacturing plants moved into the area and remained active through the 1990’s.

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boston museum of african american History

Museum of African American History

14 Stop 14 open Mon-Sat from 10am-4pm

The Museum of African American History is New England’s largest museum dedicated to telling the story of organized black communities from the Colonial period through the 19th century. A variety of exhibits, programs, events and educational activities are presented that showcase the stories of black families – from how they lived, educated their children, worshiped, worked, created artwork and how they organized politically to advance the cause of freedom. Located within the African Meeting House, which is the oldest African Meeting House in America and inside the Abiel Smith School, which was the first building in the country constructed for the sole purpose of housing a black public school, the buildings themselves are a big part of the rich heritage and incredible past of the African Americans in New England.

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boston acorn street

Acorn Street

14 Stop 14

One of the most photographed streets in the city, Acorn Street offers visitors a reminiscent ride back to colonial Boston. It was on this lovely street that 19th century artisans and trades people lived and today the row houses are considered to be a prestigious address in Beacon Hill.

boston nichols house

Nichols House Museum

14 Stop 14

Built in 1805 and renovated in 1830, the Nichols House Museum was constructed by architect Charles Bulfinch. The museum takes its name from Rose Standish Nichols, who lived in the house between 1885 and 1960, and represents the lifestyle of the American upper class during that period. The Nichols House Museum offers a room-by-room tour of the four-story row house, which is decorated in original furnishings.

boston charles river esplanade

Charles River Esplanade/Hatch Shell

14 Stop 14

Charles River Esplanade is one of the many examples of land set aside in Boston for public enjoyment. During the summer you can catch a free concert or play at the Hatch Shell, or watch the rowers practice in the Charles River as you stroll in the park.

boston cambridge

Cambridge

13 Stop 13

Visit Cambridge and explore The M.I.T. Museum, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and Harvard Square.

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boston harvard square

Harvard Square

13 Stop 13 (617) 495-1573

Harvard Square is an intellectual and offbeat area with a mix of languages, ages, and cultures. Its streets are lined with coffeehouses, independent bookstores, cinemas, and music stores. The centerpiece of the area, Harvard University, is the oldest institution of higher learning in America, established in 1636. Its long list of famous alumni includes seven presidents of the United States. The campus is distinguished by a diverse collection of historic buildings and the acclaimed Harvard University Museum offers expansive collections. For information, visit the University Events & Information Center on Massachusetts Avenue.

boston mit

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (M.I.T.)

13 Stop 13

The campus of this world renowned science and technology institution extends more than a mile along the Charles River Basin. The school was founded by William Barton Rogers in 1861, with the founding philosophy of “learning by doing.” During WWII, the school served as a federally funded research and development center. In 1916, George Eastman donated the funds to build a new campus on the Cambridge side of the Charles River.

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boston historic ballpark

Historic Ballpark

12 Stop 12 open 9am-4pm

Get your behind the scenes look at America’s most legendary ballpark, Boston’s Historic Ballpark. Visit the place where Carlton Fisk hit one of baseball’s most famous homeruns, walk the same warning track once strolled by Ted Williams, and even touch the beloved “Green Monster.” Tours leave hourly from the Souvenir Store on Yawkey Way seven days a week.

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boston christian science plaza

Christian Science Plaza

9 Stop 9

The Christian Science Plaza is the location of the First Church of Christ, Scientist, one of the largest churches in New England. The plaza consists of 14 spacious and serene acres, paved in brick and granite, with orderly rows of trees, buildings, stone benches, a large reflecting pool and a circular fountain. The Mother Church, built in 1894, consists of a Romanesque Church Edifice with a bell tower and stained glass windows, and the larger Church Extension, added in 1906, is a mix of Renaissance and Byzantine architecture.

boston symphony hall

Symphony Hall

9 Stop 9

The Symphony Hall in Boston, Massachusetts is considered one of the top concert halls in the world because of its impressive acoustics. The Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Boston Pops share the hall. The Symphony Hall was designed through a collaboration of architects McKim, Mead and White and assistant professor of physics at Harvard University, Wallace Clement Sabine. Sixteen Greek and Roman statue replicas line the walls of the hall and Beethoven’s name is inscribed over the stage. The Symphony Hall’s organ, a 4,800 pipe Aeolian-Skinner, is also considered to be one of the best in the world. It was installed in 1949 and is autographed by Albert Schweitzer.

boston mapparium mary baker eddy library

Mapparium at Mary Baker Eddy Library

11 Stop 11 open Closed on Mondays

The Mary Baker Eddy Library is a three-story, stained-glass globe with a thirty-foot glass bridge passing through the center. Travel to the center of the world and experience the Mapparium’s three-dimensional 1935 map, with a presentation including words, music, and LED lights to illustrate the development of ideas over time. The Monitor & Quest Galleries, the Hall of Ideas, and interactive exhibits are also open to the public.

boston isabella stewart gardner museum

Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

9 Stop 9

Isabella Stewart Gardner, a patron of the arts, established the museum in 1903 when her own property on Beacon Hill became too small for her growing collection. The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum was designed as a replica of the 15th century Venetian style palazzo. Because Gardner disliked the cold, impersonal experience that museums usually offer, she chose the palazzo-style, a design which provides natural light and garden views. The museum, a must-see Boston attraction, features three floors of galleries surrounding a garden courtyard. The collection includes paintings, sculpture, tapestries, furniture, and decorative arts spanning 300 years, from locations around the world.

boston museum of fine arts

Museum of Fine Arts (MFA)

9 Stop 9

The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston is one of the largest museums in the U.S., housing the second largest permanent museum collection in the Western Hemisphere. The museum is affiliated with the School of the Museum of Fine Arts and the sister museum, the Nagoya/Boston Museum of Fine Arts, in Nagoya, Japan. The Museum of Fine Arts offers a fine permanent collection from the masters of American painting as well as a vast selection of works of art from all important periods; it also hosts special exhibits on loan from around the world.

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boston prudential center skywalk

Prudential Center Skywalk

11 Stop 11

The Boston Skywalk Observatory is located on the 50th floor of the Prudential Center. From this vantage point you have sweeping 360-degree views of the city and beyond. On a clear day, you can see the mountains of New Hampshire. The Skywalk offers a state-of-the-art Antennae Audio Tour pointing out historic and cultural attractions, and special interactive, audiovisual exhibits on Boston history and architecture.

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boston uss cassin young

USS Cassin Young

3 Stop 3 (617) 242-1812

The USS Constitution was one of the six frigates whose construction was authorized by the Naval Act of 1794, part of the initial development of the Navy after the American Revolution. Originally launched in 1797, she is the oldest commissioned warship afloat in the world and currently sits in the Boston Navy Yard, formerly called the Charlestown Navy Yard.
Closed on Mondays during the off season. For exact hours of operation please call (617) 242-1812.

boston museum of science

Museum of Science (MOS)

4 Stop 4

Boston’s Museum of Science, located on the Charles River Basin, has over 500 interactive exhibits and a variety of live presentations throughout the day. The museum also features a planetarium, New England’s only domed IMAX, a theater of electricity with one of the world’s largest Van de Graaff generators, and exhibits from the original Computer History Museum. Beginning with a collection of men sharing scientific interests in the early 1830’s, the museum still houses some of the artifacts that were originally stored and displayed.

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Cheers Bar

7 Stop 7

The historic landmark pub was transformed from a long-standing neighborhood gathering spot for locals into one of Boston’s must-see stops for visitors after gaining notoriety as the location of the popular 1980’s TV sitcom, Cheers. The Cheers Pub was founded in 1969 and was discovered in 1981 by Hollywood couple Mary Ann and Glenn Charles. During their visit, they photographed the interior and exterior of the pub, which they gave to the set designer back in Hollywood to replicate for the set of the show. Cheers premiered on NBC in 1982 and remained on the air for 11 seasons, receiving over 100 Emmy nominations over the years. The pub eventually changed its name to Cheers to avoid confusion.

boston public garden

Boston Public Garden

6 Stop 6

The landscaped, 24-acre Boston Public Garden, established in 1837, was the first public botanical garden in the U.S. The Public Garden contains lovely manicured paths, the famous “Make Way for Ducklings” statues, a 4-acre pond with swans and a variety of other birds, and several memorable statues throughout. You can enjoy a leisurely ride aboard the Swan Boats, pedal-powered gondolas which have been in operation during the summer months since 1877.

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old south meeting house

Old South Meeting House

5 Stop 5

The Old South Meeting House was the largest building in colonial Boston and stands today as a symbol of the right to free speech and free assembly. The most well known meeting that took place here was held by the Sons of Liberty on December 16, 1773. The discussion in protest of the British tax on tea led directly to the Boston Tea Party, which took place later that very evening. 5,000 colonists gathered in the Old South Meeting House that day, an example of one of the larger crowds that could not have been accommodated by Faneuil Hall.

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boston uss constitution

USS Constitution and Museum

3 Stop 3 open Closed on Mondays during the off season.

Launched in 1797, the USS Constitution is the oldest commissioned warship still afloat. Crisscrossing the globe, this three-masted frigate participated in the Barbary War off the coast of North Africa and sailed the Caribbean in search of pirates. She earned her nom de guerre Old Ironsides during the War of 1812 when enemy cannonballs bounced off her resilient wooden hull. Docked in the Charlestown Navy Yard, the famous ship is a floating museum open to public. It is also a stop on the on the Freedom Trail and the Old Town Trolley.

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boston copps hill burying ground

Copp’s Hill Burying Ground

2 Stop 2

The gravestones in Copp’s Hill Burying Ground, Boston’s second oldest burying ground, tell the story of the population of the North End in colonial times. Originally known as Windmill Hill, the hill took the name of William Copp, a shoemaker who donated the land for a burying ground in 1659. It is the place of rest for thousands of artisans, craftspeople, and merchants. Some of the well known individuals are Increase and Cotton Mather, of the family of ministers, Robert Newman, sexton of the Old North Church at the time of Paul Revere’s ride, Edmund Hart, shipyard owner and builder of the USS Constitution, and Shem Drowne, the artist who made the weathervane for Faneuil Hall, among others.

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boston-old-north-church

Old North Church

2 Stop 2

Officially called Christ Church, the Old North Church is the oldest church building in Boston, a National Historic Landmark, and a stop on the Freedom Trail. Built in 1723, the Old North Church was inspired by the works of Christopher Wren, a British architect. It is most commonly known as the first stop on Paul Revere’s “Midnight Ride,” where he instructed three Boston Patriots to hang two lanterns in the church’s steeple. The lanterns were used to inform Charlestown Patriots that the British were approaching by sea and not by land.

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boston paul revere house

Paul Revere House

2 Stop 2

Built in 1680, the unimposing wooden house at 19 North Square is the oldest house in downtown Boston. The 3-story building was the home of silversmith and Boston Patriot Paul Revere from 1770-1800, previously housing the parsonage of the Second Church of Boston. Revere sold the house in 1800 and it became a tenement with the ground floor used for shops and various businesses over the years. In 1902, Revere’s great-grandson purchased the property and restored it so that it could be opened to the public. In 1908, after restoration by architects and preservationists, the Paul Revere House opened to the public as one of the earliest historic house museums in Boston and the U.S.

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New England Aquarium

1 Stop 1

The New England Aquarium, situated on the scenic Central Wharf, has more than a dozen exhibits that highlight hundreds of different species from around the world. Attracting 1.3 million visitors each year, the Boston Waterfront attraction recreates natural habitats ranging from reefs and tide pools to rocky shorelines. In addition to its exhibits, the aquarium offers Whale Watch excursions that take visitors 30 miles east of Boston to Stellwagen Bank where you can see whales, dolphins, sea birds and other marine life. The aquarium also has an IMAX® Theater that features films of animals and their habitats, 3-D movies and first-run feature

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boston massacre site

Boston Massacre Site

5 Stop 5

On March 5, 1770, the tension from the British military occupation of Boston escalated into the event now referred to as the Boston Massacre. There was heavy military presence in downtown Boston in order to maintain control over civilians and to enforce the Townshend Act. Various brawls between soldiers and civilians had taken place; but the evening of March 5th was the first to result in civilian deaths. Today the site of the massacre is marked by a cobblestone ring on the traffic island at the intersection of Devonshire and State Streets.

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boston freedom trail

Freedom Trail

15 Stop 15 open Mon-Sat

Relive history and discover our nation’s fascinating past and the American Revolution as you walk along Boston’s Freedom Trail. On this 2.5-mile, red-lined brick route, you’ll stroll your way to churches, burial grounds, museums and meeting houses, each with a compelling story that played a significant role in the shaping of America.

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boston faneuil hall

Faneuil Hall

1 Stop 1 (617) 426-6500 open 7 Days a Week

One of Boston’s most well known historic sites, Faneuil Hall Marketplace was constructed in 1742 and served as a marketplace and meeting hall since it first opened its doors. Named after the wealthy merchant who provided funding for the hall, Peter Faneuil, this significant structure has been the site of many important and inspirational speeches by famed Americans, including Samuel Adams. When visiting Boston, a stop here is definitely a must do.

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