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Faneuil Hall

200 Atlantic Ave, Boston, MA 02110

Tickets Sold at this Stop

Atlantic Avenue at corner of State Street

Stop #1 is our primary staging and ticketing area, located at 200 Atlantic Avenue, directly on the end of the Marriott Long Wharf Hotel. Stop # 1 is also directly across the street from Faneuil Hall Marketplace, and immediately next door to Christopher Columbus Park.

Historic North End

52 Eastern Ave, Boston, MA 02110, USA

Commercial Street near the base of Fleet Street

Stop #2 is on Commercial Street, directly in front of a Starbucks, at Lewis Wharf near the merge of Atlantic Avenue, and one block down from the cross street of Eastern Avenue.

USS Constitution and Museum

Constitution Road between 1st Ave. and 2nd Ave.

(Closest cross street is Chelsea Street).

Stop #3 is located directly in front of Gate #1 at the Charlestown Navy Yard. The driveway and Gate #1 are just off of Constitution Road, one block down from the cross street of Chelsea Street.

North Station / TD Garden

Westbound side of Causeway Street between
Beverly Street and Accolon Way.

Stop #4 is on the Westbound side of Causeway Street at Portal Park in front of the Bobby Orr Statue (hockey player). Diagonally across the street is a restaurant called Tavern on the Square.

Downtown Crossing / Historic District

State Street between Washington and Congress Streets.

Tickets Sold at this Stop

Stop #5 is on State Street, directly across from the Old State House Museum. The trolley picks up at the glass bus shelter that's on the brick plaza across the street from the Old State House.

Trolley Stop Store / Theater District

Charles Street South at Boylston Street and Park Plaza.

Tickets Sold at this Stop

Stop #6 is located at the corner of Charles Street South and Boylston, directly across from the Boston Common, and diagonally across from the Boston Public Garden. The trolley pulls in directly in front of our souvenir shop called The Trolley Stop.

Cheers Bar

84 Beacon Street

Tickets Sold at this Stop

Between River and Brimmer Streets.

The trolley picks up directly in front of Cheers, near the corner of Brimmer.

Copley Square / Back Bay

Saint James Street, between Clarendon and
Dartmouth, across from Trinity Place

Stop #8 is in Copley Square, on Saint James Street, on the same side of the street as Trinity Church (across the street from the Fairmont Copley Plaza Hotel). The trolley picks up after the crosswalk closest to the bus shelters (about 100 feet before the bus shelters).

Christian Science Plaza / Symphony Hall

120 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02116

Stop #9 is located directly in front of the Colonnade Hotel, at 120 Huntington Avenue, near the corner of West Newton Street. The stop is directly across the street from the Shops at Prudential Center, and diagonally across from the Christian Science Center plaza.

Copley Place Mall

Huntington Avenue

Tickets Sold at this Stop

Huntington Avenue at the exit of the Carriage Way from the Marriott Copley Place Hotel

Stop #10 In front of the Marriott Copley Place Hotel. The trolley stops at the traffic light at the exit of the Marriott Copley Place Carriage Way.

Prudential Center / Skywalk Observatory

Dalton Street between Belvidere and Scotia.

Tickets Sold at this Stop

Stop #11 is located directly in front of the Sheraton Boston Hotel, and on the same side of the street as the hotel.

Historic Ballpark

Ipswich Street between Van Ness and Boylston.

Stop #12 is located on Ipswich Street, across from the Ted Williams statue and directly in front of the public parking area. There is a sign on the fence indicating where the Old Town Trolley picks up.

Cambridge / MIT / Harvard

Dock and Hayward Streets.

Stop #13 is located across the street from the Marriott Cambridge Hotel, on the same side of the street as the Inbound station (Kendall Square) of the Red Line subway. The trolley pulls in directly next to the MIT Bookstore.

Beacon Hill / Antique Row

Charles Street at Mount Vernon Street.

Stop #14 is located on Charles Street at the corner of Mount Vernon. The Tatte Bakery and Café is on that corner and a Peet’s Coffee Shop is directly across the street.

State House / Boston Common

Beacon Street at Park Street.

Stop #15 is located at the top of Beacon Hill, directly across from the Massachusetts State House, and on same side of the street as the Boston Common. There is a large outdoor sculpture near the corner of Park Street. The trolley pulls in next to the large granite staircase just before the monument.

Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum

Sleeper Street

Stop #16 is located between the MBTA bus stop signs, directly in front of 313 Congress Street. It is located exactly opposite the Congress Street entrance to the Children Museum

South Station

245 Summer Street

Stop #17 is located at the MBTA bus shelter, in front of 245 Summer Street. People arriving in Boston at South Station should be sure they exit South Station on the Summer Street side and walk to their right 75 feet to the MBTA bus shelter at 245 Summer.

Boston Convention Center

Summer Street between East Side Drive and D Street.

Stop #18 is located directly in front of main entrance to the Westin Waterfront Hotel, next door to the Boston Convention & Exposition Center. The trolley pulls into the hotel's driveway, off of Summer Street, and stops right in front of the hotel's front door.

Massport/Black Falcon Cruise Ship Terminal

11 Drydock Ave, Boston, MA 02210, USA

Exit the cruise terminal, turn left and go to the end of the parking lot; you'll see a white tent there.

Boston Fish Pier

Seaport Blvd. and the Entrance to the Boston Fish Pier.

Stop #19 is located in the Seaport District on Seaport Blvd. at the western corner of the entrance to the Boston Fish Pier directly across from D Street.

156-200 Atlantic Ave, Boston, MA 02110, USA GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

52 Eastern Ave, Boston, MA 02110, USA GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

151-167 Constitution Rd, Boston, MA 02129, USA GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

164-184 Causeway St, Boston, MA 02114, USA GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

2-28 State St, Boston, MA 02109, USA GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

2 Park Plaza, Boston, MA 02116, USA GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

84 Beacon St, Boston, MA 02108, USA GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

278 MA-28, Boston, MA 02116, USA GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

138 St James Ave, Boston, MA 02116, USA GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

96 Dartmouth St, Boston, MA 02116, USA GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

571 MA-28, Boston, MA 02118, USA GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

120 MA-9, Boston, MA 02116, USA GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

110 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02116, USA GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

177 Dartmouth St, Boston, MA 02116, USA GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

40 Dalton St, Boston, MA 02115, USA GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

204-254 Ipswich St, Boston, MA 02215, USA GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

72-88 Vassar St, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

322 Main St, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

68-70 Charles St, Boston, MA 02114, USA GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

28 Beacon St, Boston, MA 02108, USA GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

295-307 Congress St, Boston, MA 02210, USA GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

245 Summer St, Boston, MA 02210, USA GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

435 Summer St, Boston, MA 02210, USA GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

11 Drydock Ave, Boston, MA 02210, USA GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

225 Northern Ave, Boston, MA 02210, USA GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

156-200 Atlantic Ave, Boston, MA 02110, USA GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

156-200 Atlantic Ave, Boston, MA 02110, USA

245 Summer St, Boston, MA 02210, USA

435 Summer St, Boston, MA 02210, USA

11 Drydock Ave, Boston, MA 02210, USA

225 Northern Ave, Boston, MA 02210, USA

156-200 Atlantic Ave, Boston, MA 02110, USA

1634 Freedom Trail, Boston, MA 02108, USA

26 Beacon St, Boston, MA 02108, USA

125 Tremont St, Boston, MA 02108, USA

60 School St, Boston, MA 02108, USA

280 Freedom Trail, Boston, MA 02108, USA

Freedom Trail, Boston, MA 02109, USA

Freedom Trail, Boston, MA 02109, USA

99 Union St, Boston, MA 02108, USA

199 Richmond St, Boston, MA 02113, USA

188 Freedom Trail, Boston, MA 02113, USA

339 Freedom Trail, Boston, MA 02113, USA

59 Freedom Trail, Boston, MA 02113, USA

532 Freedom Trail, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA

50 Freedom Trail, Boston, MA 02129, USA

56 Winthrop St, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA

9 Freedom Trail, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA

12 Freedom Trail, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA

100 Freedom Trail, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA

28 Beacon St, Boston, MA 02108, USA

20 Mt Vernon St, Boston, MA 02108, USA

118 Mt Vernon St, Boston, MA 02108, USA

106 Revere St, Boston, MA 02114, USA

325 Cambridge St, Boston, MA 02114, USA

28 Beacon St, Boston, MA 02108, USA

Faneuil Hall

200 Atlantic Ave, Boston, MA 02110

Tickets Sold at this Stop

Atlantic Avenue at corner of State Street

Stop #1 is our primary staging and ticketing area, located at 200 Atlantic Avenue, directly on the end of the Marriott Long Wharf Hotel. Stop # 1 is also directly across the street from Faneuil Hall Marketplace, and immediately next door to Christopher Columbus Park.

GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

Historic North End

52 Eastern Ave, Boston, MA 02110, USA

Commercial Street near the base of Fleet Street

Stop #2 is on Commercial Street, directly in front of a Starbucks, at Lewis Wharf near the merge of Atlantic Avenue, and one block down from the cross street of Eastern Avenue.

GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

USS Constitution and Museum

Constitution Road between 1st Ave. and 2nd Ave.

(Closest cross street is Chelsea Street).

Stop #3 is located directly in front of Gate #1 at the Charlestown Navy Yard. The driveway and Gate #1 are just off of Constitution Road, one block down from the cross street of Chelsea Street.

GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

North Station / TD Garden

Westbound side of Causeway Street between
Beverly Street and Accolon Way.

Stop #4 is on the Westbound side of Causeway Street at Portal Park in front of the Bobby Orr Statue (hockey player). Diagonally across the street is a restaurant called Tavern on the Square.

GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

Downtown Crossing / Historic District

State Street between Washington and Congress Streets.

Tickets Sold at this Stop

Stop #5 is on State Street, directly across from the Old State House Museum. The trolley picks up at the glass bus shelter that's on the brick plaza across the street from the Old State House.

GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

Trolley Stop Store / Theater District

Charles Street South at Boylston Street and Park Plaza.

Tickets Sold at this Stop

Stop #6 is located at the corner of Charles Street South and Boylston, directly across from the Boston Common, and diagonally across from the Boston Public Garden. The trolley pulls in directly in front of our souvenir shop called The Trolley Stop.

GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

Cheers Bar

84 Beacon Street

Tickets Sold at this Stop

Between River and Brimmer Streets.

The trolley picks up directly in front of Cheers, near the corner of Brimmer.

GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

Copley Square / Back Bay

Saint James Street, between Clarendon and
Dartmouth, across from Trinity Place

Stop #8 is in Copley Square, on Saint James Street, on the same side of the street as Trinity Church (across the street from the Fairmont Copley Plaza Hotel). The trolley picks up after the crosswalk closest to the bus shelters (about 100 feet before the bus shelters).

GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

Christian Science Plaza / Symphony Hall

120 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02116

Stop #9 is located directly in front of the Colonnade Hotel, at 120 Huntington Avenue, near the corner of West Newton Street. The stop is directly across the street from the Shops at Prudential Center, and diagonally across from the Christian Science Center plaza.

GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

Copley Place Mall

Huntington Avenue

Tickets Sold at this Stop

Huntington Avenue at the exit of the Carriage Way from the Marriott Copley Place Hotel

Stop #10 In front of the Marriott Copley Place Hotel. The trolley stops at the traffic light at the exit of the Marriott Copley Place Carriage Way.

GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

Prudential Center / Skywalk Observatory

Dalton Street between Belvidere and Scotia.

Tickets Sold at this Stop

Stop #11 is located directly in front of the Sheraton Boston Hotel, and on the same side of the street as the hotel.

GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

Historic Ballpark

Ipswich Street between Van Ness and Boylston.

Stop #12 is located on Ipswich Street, across from the Ted Williams statue and directly in front of the public parking area. There is a sign on the fence indicating where the Old Town Trolley picks up.

GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

Cambridge / MIT / Harvard

Dock and Hayward Streets.

Stop #13 is located across the street from the Marriott Cambridge Hotel, on the same side of the street as the Inbound station (Kendall Square) of the Red Line subway. The trolley pulls in directly next to the MIT Bookstore.

GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

Beacon Hill / Antique Row

Charles Street at Mount Vernon Street.

Stop #14 is located on Charles Street at the corner of Mount Vernon. The Tatte Bakery and Café is on that corner and a Peet’s Coffee Shop is directly across the street.

GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

State House / Boston Common

Beacon Street at Park Street.

Stop #15 is located at the top of Beacon Hill, directly across from the Massachusetts State House, and on same side of the street as the Boston Common. There is a large outdoor sculpture near the corner of Park Street. The trolley pulls in next to the large granite staircase just before the monument.

GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum

Sleeper Street

Stop #16 is located between the MBTA bus stop signs, directly in front of 313 Congress Street. It is located exactly opposite the Congress Street entrance to the Children Museum

GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

South Station

245 Summer Street

Stop #17 is located at the MBTA bus shelter, in front of 245 Summer Street. People arriving in Boston at South Station should be sure they exit South Station on the Summer Street side and walk to their right 75 feet to the MBTA bus shelter at 245 Summer.

GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

Boston Convention Center

Summer Street between East Side Drive and D Street.

Stop #18 is located directly in front of main entrance to the Westin Waterfront Hotel, next door to the Boston Convention & Exposition Center. The trolley pulls into the hotel's driveway, off of Summer Street, and stops right in front of the hotel's front door.

GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

Massport/Black Falcon Cruise Ship Terminal

11 Drydock Ave, Boston, MA 02210, USA

Exit the cruise terminal, turn left and go to the end of the parking lot; you'll see a white tent there.

GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

Boston Fish Pier

Seaport Blvd. and the Entrance to the Boston Fish Pier.

Stop #19 is located in the Seaport District on Seaport Blvd. at the western corner of the entrance to the Boston Fish Pier directly across from D Street.

GET DIRECTIONS PARKING

Sheraton Hotel Depot - Stop #11

39 Dalton Street, Boston, MA 02199 GET DIRECTIONS PARKING
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Old Town Trolley Tours® of Boston
Map & Stops

Faneuil Hall

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Time to EXPLORE: 30 min

One of Boston’s most well known historic sites, Faneuil Hall Marketplace was constructed in 1742 and served as a marketplace and meeting hall since it first opened its doors. Named after the wealthy merchant who provided funding for the hall, Peter Faneuil, this significant structure has been the site of many important and inspirational speeches by famed Americans, including Samuel Adams. When visiting Boston, a stop here is definitely a must do.

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Attractions to explore near this stop

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Quincy Market
Time to EXPLORE: 1 1/2

This festival marketplace offers over 150 shops, restaurants, and merchant carts in the three buildings surrounding Faneuil Hall, North Market, Quincy Market, and South Market. Quincy Market, the center building, is a great gathering spot and place for lunch, with over 35 stands offering a global food selection. During the summer months, street performers often entertain the crowds around the marketplace. Jugglers, clowns, puppeteers, musicians, and magicians are just a few types of entertainers that can be seen on the cobblestone promenade.

Approximate Time to Allow: 1 1/2 hours for lunch and shopping

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Boston Harbor Cruises
Time to EXPLORE: 1, 3 or 5 hours

Boston Harbor Cruises has been introducing visitors to the Boston Harbor since 1926. Today they are New England’s oldest and largest cruise company. Boston Harbor Cruises offers Whale Watching, Sightseeing, Lighthouse, and Sunset Cruises, in addition to fast ferries for private functions and general entertainment. Boston Harbor Cruises also runs The Landing, Boston’s only fully outdoor patio bar and a great spot to enjoy drinks and the view of the Boston harbor. There’s no reason to trek to Boston’s Historic Ballpark when you can catch a Red Sox game on TV from the waterfront!

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New England Aquarium
Time to EXPLORE: 1 Hour

The New England Aquarium, situated on the scenic Central Wharf, has more than a dozen exhibits that highlight hundreds of different species from around the world. Attracting 1.3 million visitors each year, the Boston Waterfront attraction recreates natural habitats ranging from reefs and tide pools to rocky shorelines. In addition to its exhibits, the aquarium offers Whale Watch excursions that take visitors 30 miles east of Boston to Stellwagen Bank where you can see whales, dolphins, sea birds and other marine life. The aquarium also has an IMAX® Theater that features films of animals and their habitats, 3-D movies and first-run feature

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Historic North End

Attractions to explore near this stop

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Paul Revere House
Time to EXPLORE: 30 Minutes

Built in 1680, the unimposing wooden house at 19 North Square is the oldest house in downtown Boston. The 3-story building was the home of silversmith and Boston Patriot Paul Revere from 1770-1800, previously housing the parsonage of the Second Church of Boston. Revere sold the house in 1800 and it became a tenement with the ground floor used for shops and various businesses over the years. In 1902, Revere’s great-grandson purchased the property and restored it so that it could be opened to the public. In 1908, after restoration by architects and preservationists, the Paul Revere House opened to the public as one of the earliest historic house museums in Boston and the U.S.

  • Admissions Admissions
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Old North Church
Time to EXPLORE: 30 Minutes

Officially called Christ Church, the Old North Church is the oldest church building in Boston, a National Historic Landmark, and a stop on the Freedom Trail. Built in 1723, the Old North Church was inspired by the works of Christopher Wren, a British architect. It is most commonly known as the first stop on Paul Revere’s “Midnight Ride,” where he instructed three Boston Patriots to hang two lanterns in the church’s steeple. The lanterns were used to inform Charlestown Patriots that the British were approaching by sea and not by land.

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Copp's Hill Burying Ground
Time to EXPLORE: 30 Minutes

The gravestones in Copp’s Hill Burying Ground, Boston’s second oldest burying ground, tell the story of the population of the North End in colonial times. Originally known as Windmill Hill, the hill took the name of William Copp, a shoemaker who donated the land for a burying ground in 1659. It is the place of rest for thousands of artisans, craftspeople, and merchants. Some of the well known individuals are Increase and Cotton Mather, of the family of ministers, Robert Newman, sexton of the Old North Church at the time of Paul Revere’s ride, Edmund Hart, shipyard owner and builder of the USS Constitution, and Shem Drowne, the artist who made the weathervane for Faneuil Hall, among others.

USS Constitution and Museum

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Time to EXPLORE: 1 Hour

Launched in 1797, the USS Constitution is the oldest commissioned warship still afloat. Crisscrossing the globe, this three-masted frigate participated in the Barbary War off the coast of North Africa and sailed the Caribbean in search of pirates. She earned her nom de guerre Old Ironsides during the War of 1812 when enemy cannonballs bounced off her resilient wooden hull. Docked in the Charlestown Navy Yard, the famous ship is a floating museum open to public. It is also a stop on the on the Freedom Trail and the Old Town Trolley.

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Attractions to explore near this stop

Attractions to explore near this stop

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USS Cassin Young
Time to EXPLORE: 1 hr

The USS Constitution was one of the six frigates whose construction was authorized by the Naval Act of 1794, part of the initial development of the Navy after the American Revolution. Originally launched in 1797, she is the oldest commissioned warship afloat in the world and currently sits in the Boston Navy Yard, formerly called the Charlestown Navy Yard.
Closed on Mondays during the off season. For exact hours of operation please call (617) 242-1812.

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Bunker Hill Monument
Time to EXPLORE: 30 min

The Bunker Hill Monument was the first public obelisk in the United States designed to commemorate the Battle of Bunker Hill. The battle was actually misnamed because the majority of the action took place on Breed’s Hill and that is where the monument sits. The monument was begun in 1827 but construction had to be halted and it wasn’t completed until 1843. The architect, Solomon Willard, had the granite for the 221 ft structure brought in from Quincy, Massachusetts.

North Station / TD Garden

Attractions to explore near this stop

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Museum of Science (MOS)

Boston’s Museum of Science, located on the Charles River Basin, has over 500 interactive exhibits and a variety of live presentations throughout the day. The museum also features a planetarium, New England’s only domed IMAX, a theater of electricity with one of the world’s largest Van de Graaff generators, and exhibits from the original Computer History Museum. Beginning with a collection of men sharing scientific interests in the early 1830’s, the museum still houses some of the artifacts that were originally stored and displayed.

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TD Garden

TD Garden is the home arena for the Boston Bruins of the National Hockey League and Boston Celtics of the National Basketball Association. TD Garden is owned by Delaware North, whose CEO, Jeremy Jacobs, also owns the Bruins. It is the site of the annual Beanpot college hockey tournament, and hosts the annual Hockey East Championships.

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New England Sports Museum
Time to EXPLORE: 1 HR

The New England Sports Museum is located on the 5th and 6th floors of the TD Garden. This Boston attraction features exhibits organized by sport, including hockey (Boston Bruins, Hartford Whalers, and Olympics), basketball (Boston Celtics), football (New England Patriots), and baseball (Boston Red Sox). Concourse galleries also feature boxing, rugby, soccer and artifacts from the Boston Marathon. The museum has life-size statues of Carl Yastrzemski, Bobby Orr, Larry Bird, and Harry Agganis, an old Boston Garden hockey penalty box, and thousands of other items.

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Harrison Gray Otis House

Built in 1796 by Charles Bulfinch for Harrison Gray Otis and his wife Sally, the house is the last surviving home in what was once Boston’s most exclusive neighborhood. As a developer of Beacon Hill, Otis made a fortune, and he later served as a Representative in Congress and Mayor of Boston. The Federal Style is emulated in the home’s classic architecture and elegant furnishings.

141 Cambridge Street, Boston

Downtown Crossing / Historic District

Attractions to explore near this stop

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Boston Massacre Site
Time to EXPLORE: 1 hour

On March 5, 1770, the tension from the British military occupation of Boston escalated into the event now referred to as the Boston Massacre. There was heavy military presence in downtown Boston in order to maintain control over civilians and to enforce the Townshend Act. Various brawls between soldiers and civilians had taken place; but the evening of March 5th was the first to result in civilian deaths. Today the site of the massacre is marked by a cobblestone ring on the traffic island at the intersection of Devonshire and State Streets.

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Old South Meeting House
Time to EXPLORE: 30 Minutes

The Old South Meeting House was the largest building in colonial Boston and stands today as a symbol of the right to free speech and free assembly. The most well known meeting that took place here was held by the Sons of Liberty on December 16, 1773. The discussion in protest of the British tax on tea led directly to the Boston Tea Party, which took place later that very evening. 5,000 colonists gathered in the Old South Meeting House that day, an example of one of the larger crowds that could not have been accommodated by Faneuil Hall.

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Old State House
Time to EXPLORE: 1 Hour

The Old State House, built in 1713 on the site of the first Town House, is the oldest surviving public building in Boston. The building served as a meeting place for the exchange of economic and local news and was said to be the center of politics in the colonies. The Declaration of Independence was read from the balcony on the east side of the building, and just below it is the spot where the Boston Massacre took place. The Old State House is one of the most important public buildings in the U.S.

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Old Corner Bookstore

The Old Corner Bookstore, located on the corner of School and Washington Streets, was built in 1718 as an apothecary shop and residence. During the 19th century, it housed the Ticknor and Fields Publishing House and later became the literary center of Boston. Authors such as Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Henry David Thoreau brought manuscripts here to be published. It is now known as the Globe Corner Bookstore and specializes in New England travel books and maps. Before the Old Corner Bookstore was built, the original building was the home of Mrs. Anne Hutchison, who was condemned for her dissent from Puritan orthodoxy.

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Boston Latin School

Established in 1635, the Boston Latin School was the first public school in America. By inviting boys of any social class to enter, the school set a precedent for tax-supported public education. The Boston Latin School’s curriculum is inspired by the 18th century latin-school movement, which centered on the idea that study of the classics was the basis of an educated mind. Some of the school’s most famous students were Ben Franklin, Samuel Adams, Henry Ward Beecher, Ralph Waldo Emerson, John Hancock, and Leonard Bernstein. A statue of Benjamin Franklin keeps a watchful eye on the site and a mosaic on the sidewalk behind King’s Chapel marks the spot as well.

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Kings Chapel & Burying Ground
Time to EXPLORE: 30 Minutes

Kings Chapel is a Christian Unitarian church located on Tremont and School Streets. The church was organized in 1686 as an Anglican Church. In 1785 it became the oldest member of the Unitarian Universalist Association and the first Anglican Church. Beside the church is the Kings Chapel Burying Ground, which was Boston’s only burial ground for 30 years. Many historical figures are buried here, including John Winthrop, the colony governor, William Dawes, who rode with Paul Revere on the Midnight Ride, Mary Chilton, the first woman off the Mayflower, and William Emerson, Ralph Waldo Emerson’s father. The original building was a wooden church built in 1688 and it was replaced by the current stone building in 1754. The bell was hung in 1772 and was recast by Paul Revere in 1814; it still rings at services today.

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Harrison Gray Otis House

Built in 1796 by Charles Bulfinch for Harrison Gray Otis and his wife Sally, the house is the last surviving home in what was once Boston’s most exclusive neighborhood. As a developer of Beacon Hill, Otis made a fortune, and he later served as a Representative in Congress and Mayor of Boston. The Federal Style is emulated in the home’s classic architecture and elegant furnishings.

141 Cambridge Street, Boston

Trolley Stop Store / Theater District

Attractions to explore near this stop

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Boston Public Garden
Time to EXPLORE: 1 Hour

The landscaped, 24-acre Boston Public Garden, established in 1837, was the first public botanical garden in the U.S. The Public Garden contains lovely manicured paths, the famous “Make Way for Ducklings” statues, a 4-acre pond with swans and a variety of other birds, and several memorable statues throughout. You can enjoy a leisurely ride aboard the Swan Boats, pedal-powered gondolas which have been in operation during the summer months since 1877.

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Chinatown

Chinatown in Boston is the only historic Chinatown in New England. The area first became populated by Chinese immigrants in the early 1890’s. Before that, the area was settled by White Anglo-Saxon Protestants. Irish, Jewish, Italian, and Syrian immigrants also all lived in the area at one time or another because of the low cost of housing and job opportunities in the area. In the late 19th century, manufacturing plants moved into the area and remained active through the 1990’s.

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Cheers Bar

The historic landmark pub was transformed from a long-standing neighborhood gathering spot for locals into one of Boston’s must-see stops for visitors after gaining notoriety as the location of the popular 1980’s TV sitcom, Cheers. The Cheers Pub was founded in 1969 and was discovered in 1981 by Hollywood couple Mary Ann and Glenn Charles. During their visit, they photographed the interior and exterior of the pub, which they gave to the set designer back in Hollywood to replicate for the set of the show. Cheers premiered on NBC in 1982 and remained on the air for 11 seasons, receiving over 100 Emmy nominations over the years. The pub eventually changed its name to Cheers to avoid confusion.

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Boston Theater District
Time to EXPLORE: 1 Hour

More than a dozen theaters are clustered in the Boston Theater District. On Warrenton Street or Shear Madness Alley, the Charles Playhouse is home to the Blue Man Group, as well as Shear Madness, the country’s longest running non-musical play. Other theaters include the Colonial, Shubert, Orpheum, Opera, Emerson Majestic & Wilbur, most of which were built in the grand architectural style of early 1900s performance halls. These beautifully restored Boston gems, some intimate, some grand, host critically acclaimed productions.

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Cheers Bar

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The historic landmark pub was transformed from a long-standing neighborhood gathering spot for locals into one of Boston’s must-see stops for visitors after gaining notoriety as the location of the popular 1980’s TV sitcom, Cheers. The Cheers Pub was founded in 1969 and was discovered in 1981 by Hollywood couple Mary Ann and Glenn Charles. During their visit, they photographed the interior and exterior of the pub, which they gave to the set designer back in Hollywood to replicate for the set of the show. Cheers premiered on NBC in 1982 and remained on the air for 11 seasons, receiving over 100 Emmy nominations over the years. The pub eventually changed its name to Cheers to avoid confusion.

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Attractions to explore near this stop

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Acorn Street

One of the most photographed streets in the city, Acorn Street offers visitors a reminiscent ride back to colonial Boston. It was on this lovely street that 19th century artisans and trades people lived and today the row houses are considered to be a prestigious address in Beacon Hill.

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Boston Common

Boston Common was established in 1634 and is on the List of National Historic Landmarks. Today, this expansive green space is the starting point of the Freedom Trail and the anchor of the Emerald Necklace, a system of connected parks that winds through various Boston neighborhoods. Its long history includes being used as a campgrounds for British Troops, the site of public executions and the place where several notable visionaries and leaders gave legendary speeches including Martin Luther King Jr., Pope John Paul II and Gloria Steinem. Today, Boston Common is still a place for many public gatherings, festivals, events, concerts and sports as well as a pleasant place to jog, bike and walk while enjoying the pretty scenery. Located at the foot of Beacon Hill.

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Gibson House Museum

The Gibson House offers visitors a glimpse into 19th century living in Boston’s Back Bay. As one of the Back Bay’s first residences, the Gibson House was built in the mid-19th century and remains the unspoiled residence of a well-to-do Victorian Boston family. Kitchen, scullery, butler’s pantry, and baths, as well as formal rooms and personal quarters are filled with the Gibsons’ original furniture and personal possessions. Located on 137 Beacon Street, between Arlington and Berkeley Streets, Boston.

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Copley Square / Back Bay

Attractions to explore near this stop

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Trinity Church
Time to EXPLORE: 30 Minutes

Boston’s Trinity Church was founded in 1733 and was originally located in downtown Boston. After the Great Boston Fire of 1872, the church complex moved to its current location and construction was completed in 1877. The impressive church was designed by Henry Hobson Richardson and is the first instance of the Richardsonian Romanesque style. Trinity Church is a Boston landmark and a cultural center for the city.

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Boston Public Library
Time to EXPLORE: 1 Hour

As the oldest large free-lending library in America, the Boston Public Library was designed as a “palace for the people.” The McKim building includes a children’s room, the first in the country, and a sculpture garden with an arcaded gallery surrounding it. When facing the Copley Square side, the library façade resembles a 16th century Italian palace. Bates Hall is the library’s magnificent reading room, named after the library’s original benefactor Joshua Bates.

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Newbury Street

Eight blocks filled with salons, boutiques, and fabulous dining. Boston’s Newbury Street has something for everyone. Shops include The Boston Baked Bean, So Good Jewelry, Niketown, Hempest and more.

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Christian Science Plaza / Symphony Hall

Attractions to explore near this stop

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Museum of Fine Arts (MFA)
Time to EXPLORE: 1 Hour

The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston is one of the largest museums in the U.S., housing the second largest permanent museum collection in the Western Hemisphere. The museum is affiliated with the School of the Museum of Fine Arts and the sister museum, the Nagoya/Boston Museum of Fine Arts, in Nagoya, Japan. The Museum of Fine Arts offers a fine permanent collection from the masters of American painting as well as a vast selection of works of art from all important periods; it also hosts special exhibits on loan from around the world.

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Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum
Time to EXPLORE: 1 Hour

Isabella Stewart Gardner, a patron of the arts, established the museum in 1903 when her own property on Beacon Hill became too small for her growing collection. The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum was designed as a replica of the 15th century Venetian style palazzo. Because Gardner disliked the cold, impersonal experience that museums usually offer, she chose the palazzo-style, a design which provides natural light and garden views. The museum, a must-see Boston attraction, features three floors of galleries surrounding a garden courtyard. The collection includes paintings, sculpture, tapestries, furniture, and decorative arts spanning 300 years, from locations around the world.

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Symphony Hall
Time to EXPLORE: 30 Minutes

The Symphony Hall in Boston, Massachusetts is considered one of the top concert halls in the world because of its impressive acoustics. The Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Boston Pops share the hall. The Symphony Hall was designed through a collaboration of architects McKim, Mead and White and assistant professor of physics at Harvard University, Wallace Clement Sabine. Sixteen Greek and Roman statue replicas line the walls of the hall and Beethoven’s name is inscribed over the stage. The Symphony Hall’s organ, a 4,800 pipe Aeolian-Skinner, is also considered to be one of the best in the world. It was installed in 1949 and is autographed by Albert Schweitzer.

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Christian Science Plaza

The Christian Science Plaza is the location of the First Church of Christ, Scientist, one of the largest churches in New England. The plaza consists of 14 spacious and serene acres, paved in brick and granite, with orderly rows of trees, buildings, stone benches, a large reflecting pool and a circular fountain. The Mother Church, built in 1894, consists of a Romanesque Church Edifice with a bell tower and stained glass windows, and the larger Church Extension, added in 1906, is a mix of Renaissance and Byzantine architecture.

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Copley Place Mall

Attractions to explore near this stop

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Copley Place

Copley Square, named after the American portraitist John Singleton Copley, is a historic focal point of this busy commercial area. A bronze statue of Copley can be found on the northern side of the square. Nearby Boylston Street offers shopping and attractions plus Newbury Street features upscale boutiques and restaurants in its quaint 19th century townhouses.

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Newbury Street

Eight blocks filled with salons, boutiques, and fabulous dining. Boston’s Newbury Street has something for everyone. Shops include The Boston Baked Bean, So Good Jewelry, Niketown, Hempest and more.

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Prudential Center Skywalk

The Boston Skywalk Observatory is located on the 50th floor of the Prudential Center. From this vantage point you have sweeping 360-degree views of the city and beyond. On a clear day, you can see the mountains of New Hampshire. The Skywalk offers a state-of-the-art Antennae Audio Tour pointing out historic and cultural attractions, and special interactive, audiovisual exhibits on Boston history and architecture.

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Prudential Center / Skywalk Observatory

Attractions to explore near this stop

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Copley Square / Back Bay

Named to honor the famed Boston artist John Singleton Copley, this Back Bay neighborhood is well known for its history and iconic architectural structures. Here, you can spend the day enjoying its charms in the way of various cafes, historical points of interest and upscale shops. There is also much to do, see and explore just footsteps away.

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Newbury Street

Eight blocks filled with salons, boutiques, and fabulous dining. Boston’s Newbury Street has something for everyone. Shops include The Boston Baked Bean, So Good Jewelry, Niketown, Hempest and more.

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Mapparium at Mary Baker Eddy Library
Time to EXPLORE: 1 hr

The Mary Baker Eddy Library is a three-story, stained-glass globe with a thirty-foot glass bridge passing through the center. Travel to the center of the world and experience the Mapparium’s three-dimensional 1935 map, with a presentation including words, music, and LED lights to illustrate the development of ideas over time. The Monitor & Quest Galleries, the Hall of Ideas, and interactive exhibits are also open to the public.

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Historic Ballpark

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Get your behind the scenes look at America’s most legendary ballpark, Boston’s Historic Ballpark. Visit the place where Carlton Fisk hit one of baseball’s most famous homeruns, walk the same warning track once strolled by Ted Williams, and even touch the beloved “Green Monster.” Tours leave hourly from the Souvenir Store on Yawkey Way seven days a week.

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Attractions to explore near this stop

Attractions to explore near this stop

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Museum of Fine Arts (MFA)
Time to EXPLORE: 1 Hour

The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston is one of the largest museums in the U.S., housing the second largest permanent museum collection in the Western Hemisphere. The museum is affiliated with the School of the Museum of Fine Arts and the sister museum, the Nagoya/Boston Museum of Fine Arts, in Nagoya, Japan. The Museum of Fine Arts offers a fine permanent collection from the masters of American painting as well as a vast selection of works of art from all important periods; it also hosts special exhibits on loan from around the world.

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Cambridge / MIT / Harvard

Attractions to explore near this stop

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Massachusetts Institute of Technology (M.I.T.)

The campus of this world renowned science and technology institution extends more than a mile along the Charles River Basin. The school was founded by William Barton Rogers in 1861, with the founding philosophy of “learning by doing.” During WWII, the school served as a federally funded research and development center. In 1916, George Eastman donated the funds to build a new campus on the Cambridge side of the Charles River.

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Cambridge
Time to EXPLORE: 2 hrs

Visit Cambridge and explore The M.I.T. Museum, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and Harvard Square.

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MIT Museum

The M.I.T. Museum is a window into the world of some of the latest and most exciting research at MIT. Visitors can explore over 150 years of education and research in the forefront of science, engineering, and technology. Located at 265 Massachusetts Avenue, the Museum presents an exciting array of exhibitions, covering everything from artificial intelligence and oceanography, to architecture, three-dimensional holograms, and the world’s largest collection of the much loved kinetic sculptures by Arthur Ganson.

Approximate Time to Allow: 2 hrs

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Harvard University

Founded in 1636, Harvard is the oldest university in the United States. Among its graduates are seven U.S. Presidents of the United States: John Adams, John Quincy Adams, Theodore and Franklin D. Roosevelt, Rutherford B. Hayes, John F. Kennedy and Barack Obama. The campus is distinguished by a diverse collection of historic buildings and the acclaimed Harvard University Museums.

Harvard Square, Cambridge

Beacon Hill / Antique Row

Attractions to explore near this stop

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Charles Street Meeting House

The Charles Street Meeting House in Beacon Hill is a historic church that was built in 1807. Its first congregation was the Third Baptist Church, which baptized its members in the Charles River. Before the Civil War, the church was an important site for the anti-slavery movement, used for speeches by Frederick Douglass, William Lloyd Garrison, Harriet Tubman, and Sojourner Truth. The building is currently used for commercial purposes.

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Louisburg Square

Louisburg Square was designed as a model for town house development in the 1840’s but the square was not replicated because of space restrictions. Today, the area is one of the most prestigious addresses in Boston. The homeowners, not the city, own the square and the oval park. Statues of Columbus and Aristides can be seen on the north and south ends, donated by a Greek merchant in 1850. Residents in the square have included author and critic William Dean Howells, the Alcotts, including author Louisa May Alcott, and currently Secretary of State, John Kerry.

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Charles River Esplanade/Hatch Shell

Charles River Esplanade is one of the many examples of land set aside in Boston for public enjoyment. During the summer you can catch a free concert or play at the Hatch Shell, or watch the rowers practice in the Charles River as you stroll in the park.

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Nichols House Museum
Time to EXPLORE: 30 min


Built in 1805 and renovated in 1830, the Nichols House Museum was constructed by architect Charles Bulfinch. The museum takes its name from Rose Standish Nichols, who lived in the house between 1885 and 1960, and represents the lifestyle of the American upper class during that period. The Nichols House Museum offers a room-by-room tour of the four-story row house, which is decorated in original furnishings.

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Acorn Street

One of the most photographed streets in the city, Acorn Street offers visitors a reminiscent ride back to colonial Boston. It was on this lovely street that 19th century artisans and trades people lived and today the row houses are considered to be a prestigious address in Beacon Hill.

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Boston Athenaeum

One of the oldest libraries in the United States, the Athenaeum was founded in 1807 and is an exclusive club of sorts in which a membership is required to use the many magnificent resources of this institution. But feel free to visit the first floor of this historic building that is open to the public and is home to an art gallery with a variety of rotating exhibits. Marble busts, porcelain vases, oil paintings, books and more are a delight to browse through and view. There’s also a children’s room with cozy reading nooks that overlook the Granary Burying Ground.

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Boston Common

Boston Common was established in 1634 and is on the List of National Historic Landmarks. Today, this expansive green space is the starting point of the Freedom Trail and the anchor of the Emerald Necklace, a system of connected parks that winds through various Boston neighborhoods. Its long history includes being used as a campgrounds for British Troops, the site of public executions and the place where several notable visionaries and leaders gave legendary speeches including Martin Luther King Jr., Pope John Paul II and Gloria Steinem. Today, Boston Common is still a place for many public gatherings, festivals, events, concerts and sports as well as a pleasant place to jog, bike and walk while enjoying the pretty scenery. Located at the foot of Beacon Hill.

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Museum of African American History

The Museum of African American History is New England’s largest museum dedicated to telling the story of organized black communities from the Colonial period through the 19th century. A variety of exhibits, programs, events and educational activities are presented that showcase the stories of black families – from how they lived, educated their children, worshiped, worked, created artwork and how they organized politically to advance the cause of freedom. Located within the African Meeting House, which is the oldest African Meeting House in America and inside the Abiel Smith School, which was the first building in the country constructed for the sole purpose of housing a black public school, the buildings themselves are a big part of the rich heritage and incredible past of the African Americans in New England.

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Massachusetts State House
Time to EXPLORE: 1 hour

In the distinctive gold-domed building atop Beacon Hill, the past meets the present. On weekdays, you can discover Massachusetts’ history on a free tour of the center of the state government. The building, completed in 1798, was designed by Charles Bulfinch to replace the Old State House.

In addition to housing the state government, the State House also displays various portraits of governors, murals depicting the state’s heritage, and statues inside and on its grounds. The building is recognizable because of its dome sheathed in copper and covered by 23 karat gold, as seen in the film The Departed.

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State House / Boston Common

Attractions to explore near this stop

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Freedom Trail
Time to EXPLORE: 1 hours and 30 minutes

Relive history and discover our nation’s fascinating past and the American Revolution as you walk along Boston’s Freedom Trail. On this 2.5-mile, red-lined brick route, you’ll stroll your way to churches, burial grounds, museums and meeting houses, each with a compelling story that played a significant role in the shaping of America.

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Park Street Church
Time to EXPLORE: 30 min

The Park Street Church was founded in 1809 by 26 locals, who were mainly former members of the Old South Meeting House. The church became known as Brimstone Corner, possibly because the area was used for the storage of gunpowder during the War of 1812. In 1816, the Park Street Church joined the Old South Church and formed the City Mission Society, which served Boston’s poor. The church was the site of many firsts, including the nation’s first Sunday School in 1818, first prison aid in 1824, and William Lloyd Garrison’s first public statement against slavery in 1829. Park Street Church can be seen from the various surrounding neighborhoods because of its steeple, rising 217 ft. high.

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Granary Burying Ground
Time to EXPLORE: 30 min

Founded in 1660, the Granary Burying Ground is the third oldest burying ground in Boston. During the Revolution, the area where the Park Street Church now stands had been used to hold grain, which is the reason for the burying ground’s name. Located on Tremont Street, the following famous individuals are buried in the Granary Burying Grounds: Peter Faneuil, Sam Adams, Crispus Attacks, John Hancock, James Otis, Robert Treat Paine, Paul Revere, and members of Ben Franklin’s family.

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Black Heritage Trail
Time to EXPLORE: 2 hours

The Black Heritage Trail features various homes, memorials, and sites that are significant in the history of Boston’s 19th century African American community. The first slaves arrived in 1638 and by 1705 there were over 400. At this time there were also the beginnings of a free black community in the North End, and by 1790, the time of the first census, Massachusetts reported no slaves. The trail includes the Robert Gould Shaw & the 54th Regiment Memorial, first black regiment, the George Middleton House, the oldest home built by African Americans on Beacon Hill, and the Phillips School, one of Boston’s first schools with an interracial student body.

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African Meeting House
Time to EXPLORE: 30 min

Dedicated in 1806, the African Meeting House is the Oldest African American Church and was the First African Baptist Church in the United States. Over the years it also served as a school and a community meeting place. It was here that William Lloyd Garrison founded the New England Slavery Society, making it the center of the abolitionist movement. In 1972, the building was acquired by the Museum of Afro-American History and it was restored in 1987. Today, the museum commemorates African American history from slavery to the abolitionist movement, with a focus on educational equality.

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Massachusetts State House
Time to EXPLORE: 1 hour

In the distinctive gold-domed building atop Beacon Hill, the past meets the present. On weekdays, you can discover Massachusetts’ history on a free tour of the center of the state government. The building, completed in 1798, was designed by Charles Bulfinch to replace the Old State House.

In addition to housing the state government, the State House also displays various portraits of governors, murals depicting the state’s heritage, and statues inside and on its grounds. The building is recognizable because of its dome sheathed in copper and covered by 23 karat gold, as seen in the film The Departed.

  • Restrooms Restrooms
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Boston Common

Boston Common was established in 1634 and is on the List of National Historic Landmarks. Today, this expansive green space is the starting point of the Freedom Trail and the anchor of the Emerald Necklace, a system of connected parks that winds through various Boston neighborhoods. Its long history includes being used as a campgrounds for British Troops, the site of public executions and the place where several notable visionaries and leaders gave legendary speeches including Martin Luther King Jr., Pope John Paul II and Gloria Steinem. Today, Boston Common is still a place for many public gatherings, festivals, events, concerts and sports as well as a pleasant place to jog, bike and walk while enjoying the pretty scenery. Located at the foot of Beacon Hill.

Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum

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Located on the Congress Street Bridge, the Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum is an interactive, high tech, floating museum. Unlike anything you’ve ever experienced before, this unique museum sits on a barge in the water, includes tours on restored tea ships and a stunning, interactive documentary that immerses you into the events that led up to the American Revolution. Touch, feel, see and hear what the patriots felt when their passions and angers flared at the injustice of taxation without representation. Participate in multi-sensory exhibits, witness dramatic reenactments by professional actors and historians and discover the true story behind the Boston Tea Party.

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Attractions to explore near this stop

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Boston Children's Museum
Time to EXPLORE: 1 1/2 hr

The Boston Children’s Museum is a not-to-be-missed interactive experience for kids. The museum has offered innovative, educational, and fun exhibits for children and families for more than 90 years. Exhibits range from A to Z, focusing on arts, culture, and science. Kids can rock climb, work in a child-size construction zone, paint in an art studio, or even act in a short play.

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Institute of Contemporary Art
Time to EXPLORE: 1 hr

The Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston is an art museum and exhibition space, founded in 1936. Like its iconic building on Boston’s waterfront, the Institute of Contemporary Art offers new ways of engaging with the world around us. Its exhibitions and programs provide access to contemporary art, artists, and the creative process. Audiences of all ages and backgrounds are invited to participate in the excitement of new art and ideas.

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South Station

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Completed in 1899, this beautiful pink granite building has been the hub of Boston’s rail transportation for more than a century. South Station was built to be a union station for the four railroad terminals serving Boston. The train shed, which was removed in 1930 due to corrosion, was one of the largest in the world. South Station was restored in 1989, leaving 13 tracks and a smaller building, which features Boston restaurants and businesses.
Here you can catch an Amtrak train for points south, a commuter rail to Boston’s suburbs, or take the city’s red and silver lines of the subway system.

Attractions to explore near this stop

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Boston Children's Museum
Time to EXPLORE: 1 1/2 hr

The Boston Children’s Museum is a not-to-be-missed interactive experience for kids. The museum has offered innovative, educational, and fun exhibits for children and families for more than 90 years. Exhibits range from A to Z, focusing on arts, culture, and science. Kids can rock climb, work in a child-size construction zone, paint in an art studio, or even act in a short play.

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Fort Point Channel

The Channel extends from Gillette Headquarters, home to America’s premier razor manufacturer since King Gillette founded the company over 100 years ago, to the site of the Boston Tea Party on those very waters in 1773 and out into the Boston Harbor. In today’s Boston, the Fort Point Channel is bordered by restaurants, fabulous hotels and water view condos (look at the beautifully mirrored InterContinental Hotel and Residences), as well as attractions like the Children’s Museum and the recently rebuilt Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum.

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Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum

Located on the Congress Street Bridge, the Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum is an interactive, high tech, floating museum. Unlike anything you’ve ever experienced before, this unique museum sits on a barge in the water, includes tours on restored tea ships and a stunning, interactive documentary that immerses you into the events that led up to the American Revolution. Touch, feel, see and hear what the patriots felt when their passions and angers flared at the injustice of taxation without representation. Participate in multi-sensory exhibits, witness dramatic reenactments by professional actors and historians and discover the true story behind the Boston Tea Party.

  • Admissions Admissions
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  • Dining Dining
  • Entertainment Entertainment
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Boston Convention Center

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In June of 2004, the Boston Convention Center opened near the South Boston Harbor and Boston’s World Trade Center. Boston’s Convention Center is the largest in New England, offering 516,000 square feet of exhibit space, 300,000 square feet of function space, and a 40,020 square foot ballroom overlooking the city skyline and Boston Harbor. The space had originally been planned to house a stadium for the New England Patriots but concern over traffic prevented its construction.

Attractions to explore near this stop

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Black Falcon Cruise Ship Terminal

At the Black Falcon Cruise Ship Terminal, more than 100 ocean-going vessels embark for numerous destinations around the world.

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Boston Seaport District

Located on Boston’s waterfront, just across from downtown and not far from the airport, the Seaport District is one of the city’s most burgeoning neighborhoods. If you were looking at a map, you’d find this area stretches from the harbor to Fort Point Channel and into South Boston to East and West First Streets. It includes the four neighborhoods of Fort Point, Fan Pier, the Convention Center, and the Marine Industrial Park.

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Massport/Black Falcon Cruise Ship Terminal

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Stop #18A is conveniently located just outside of the Black Falcon Cruise Ship Terminal. When you exit the terminal turn left on Black Falcon Avenue; at the stop sign continue straight onto Terminal Street. You will see a fenced-in parking lot on your left, at the end of the lot turn left towards the water. At the end of the fence turn right and wait next to the fence; the orange and green Old Town Trolley will stop right by the fence.

To return to any of the piers, adults must have both ship’s card (which usually doubles as your room key) and a valid photo identification (passport, driver’s license, etc.)

Stop #18A will be open during cruise ship “port of call” days only; for more information please call 617-269-7150.

Attractions to explore near this stop

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Black Falcon Cruise Ship Terminal

At the Black Falcon Cruise Ship Terminal, more than 100 ocean-going vessels embark for numerous destinations around the world.

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Boston Seaport District

Located on Boston’s waterfront, just across from downtown and not far from the airport, the Seaport District is one of the city’s most burgeoning neighborhoods. If you were looking at a map, you’d find this area stretches from the harbor to Fort Point Channel and into South Boston to East and West First Streets. It includes the four neighborhoods of Fort Point, Fan Pier, the Convention Center, and the Marine Industrial Park.

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Boston Fish Pier

Attractions to explore near this stop

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Black Falcon Cruise Ship Terminal

At the Black Falcon Cruise Ship Terminal, more than 100 ocean-going vessels embark for numerous destinations around the world.

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Institute of Contemporary Art
Time to EXPLORE: 1 hr

The Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston is an art museum and exhibition space, founded in 1936. Like its iconic building on Boston’s waterfront, the Institute of Contemporary Art offers new ways of engaging with the world around us. Its exhibitions and programs provide access to contemporary art, artists, and the creative process. Audiences of all ages and backgrounds are invited to participate in the excitement of new art and ideas.

  • Admissions Admissions
  • Shopping Shopping
  • Entertainment Entertainment
  • Restrooms Restrooms
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Spirit of Boston Cruises
Time to EXPLORE: 2 hours or more

For a truly unique and entertaining view of Boston Harbor, consider taking a cruise aboard the Spirit of Boston. The Spirit of Boston offers a variety of cruise experiences including lunch, dinner, sunset cruises, and midnight moonlight cruises. The cruises pass the World Trade Center, Boston Tea Party site, Boston Massacre site, the Old North Church, the Bunker Hill Monument, Old Ironsides, and more.

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Massport/Black Falcon Cruise Ship Terminal

Stop #18A is conveniently located just outside of the Black Falcon Cruise Ship Terminal. When you exit the terminal turn left on Black Falcon Avenue; at the stop sign continue straight onto Terminal Street. You will see a fenced-in parking lot on your left, at the end of the lot turn left towards the water. At the end of the fence turn right and wait next to the fence; the orange and green Old Town Trolley will stop right by the fence.

To return to any of the piers, adults must have both ship’s card (which usually doubles as your room key) and a valid photo identification (passport, driver’s license, etc.)

Stop #18A will be open during cruise ship “port of call” days only; for more information please call 617-269-7150.

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Blue Hills Bank Pavilion

One of Boston’s premier concert venues, the Pavilion, is open seasonally from May through October. From Tony Bennett to K.D. Lang to Bonnie Raitt to Jay-Z; they have all played at the Bank of America Pavilion, and this year’s lineup looks just as exciting as past years. With a perfect Boston Harbor location and many outstanding “sea oriented” restaurants located nearby, as well as a cutting edge New York style steakhouse, Del Frisco’s, spending an evening in the Seaport District can be a real Boston experience. When the concert is over, visit Harpoon Brewery and Beer Hall just 100 yards away from the Pavilion.

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Boston Seaport District

Located on Boston’s waterfront, just across from downtown and not far from the airport, the Seaport District is one of the city’s most burgeoning neighborhoods. If you were looking at a map, you’d find this area stretches from the harbor to Fort Point Channel and into South Boston to East and West First Streets. It includes the four neighborhoods of Fort Point, Fan Pier, the Convention Center, and the Marine Industrial Park.

  • Admissions Admissions
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How It Works

Route Map & Stops

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Route Map & Stops

Go To Stop 1
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