Please be advised of route changes
Stop #3( Johnny Cash Museum) will be closed today, due to construction. Stop #1 is about 1 block away at 201 Broadway and 2nd Ave.
Stop # 7( Farmer’s Market) stop has moved to James Robertson Parkway @7th Ave North

 

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George Jones Museum

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nashville george jones museum

Nashville George Jones Museum

The George Jones Museum is one place that embodies the true (and new) spirit of this city that’s brimming with iconic spots. Dedicated to the life and career of one of Nashville’s greatest, this unique museum gives you the opportunity to view memorabilia, artifacts and personal belongings of the man that many consider to be the greatest country singer of all time. Here’s a guide that covers everything you need to know about the George Jones Museum.

  • Admissions Admissions
  • Shopping Shopping
  • Dining Dining
  • Entertainment Entertainment
  • Restrooms Restrooms

Bringing History To Life

nashville river viewAs you travel around Nashville, you’ll quickly discover that the city is steadily reinventing itself—with many new buildings going up seemingly every other day. And while striking new high-rises, hotels and office space take their place throughout the city, the history, the music and the persona that the city is so famous for continues to shine through. The George Jones Museum is one of those places—just opened in April 2015, that although new, brings the past to life. Here, visitors are treated to an insider’s view of the man that captivated the country music industry and according to many, was the definition of what a classic country star should be.

 

Nicknamed the “Possum” because of his turned up nose, George Jones was known for his eccentric, often reckless behavior, several scraps with the law and most importantly, his distinctive voice that captured the hearts of fans around the world. His fourth wife, Nancy, helped make the museum possible by providing many of the items on display—she wanted the world to have the opportunity to get to know the man she knew and loved and to discover just how much he loved country music. She’s also known to stop by now and again to say hello to visitors (true southern hospitality), so be on the lookout for her!

Nicknamed the “Possum” because of his turned up nose, George Jones was known for his eccentric, often reckless behavior, several scraps with the law and most importantly, his distinctive voice that captured the hearts of fans around the world. His fourth wife, Nancy, helped make the museum possible by providing many of the items on display—she wanted the world to have the opportunity to get to know the man she knew and loved and to discover just how much he loved country music. She’s also known to stop by now and again to say hello to visitors (true southern hospitality), so be on the lookout for her!

What To See

Without giving away too much, you’ll find the displays and exhibits at the George Jones Museum nearly as wild and quirky as the man himself. Possibly the most notable item

on display is the John Deere riding mower that Jones rode eight miles down the road to get to the liquor store. The story goes that Jones’ brother-in-law locked him in a room and hid his keys to force him to sober up. Having no part of it, Jones climbed out a window and rode the mower to town to get his fifth of Jack Daniels.

Also on display is a handwritten note from George that he left on the windshield of his car at the Nashville airport—asking the police not to tow it that he was unable to drive and would be back in a few days. The exhibit tells the story but surprisingly, they left the car right where it was, the engine was still running when he came back!

Of course, whether you’re a fan of the man’s music or not, you’ll quickly become one as you stroll through the museum to the rhythm of many of his hits, including “He stopped loving her today” which many believe was his greatest. Interestingly, as you will learn in the museum, George didn’t even want to record that song because he felt it was too depressing. It earned him numerous awards so in the end, it was a good decision.

Also here is the battered and torn leather jacket that Jones was wearing when he crashed his car into a bridge. There’s even a chunk of the bridge to help tell the story of this incident that landed him in the hospital (in a coma) for a week. And no-he wasn’t wearing his seatbelt!

Other interesting displays include numerous photos of the country music star throughout his life, some of his guitars, awards, newspaper clippings, a get-well fax from Keith Richards and some of the movie reels Jones kept in the trunk of his car and much more. You’ll also have the opportunity to purchase 100-proof George Jones-brand White Lightening Moonshine.

The Rooftop Bar

Deeming itself the longest bar in Nashville, the George Jones Museum Rooftop bar lovingly named “The George”, features life music daily. Providing panoramic views of the city, refreshing cocktails and a menu of bar-food specialties, The George is worth a visit after you’ve enjoyed learning about the man that inspired it.

Choices Restaurant & Bar

On the first level of the George Jones Museum is Choices Restaurant and Bar. If you’re hungry you can get your fill of delicious southern eats like fried green tomatoes, shrimp corn dogs, white lightening nachos and more. They serve lunch and dinner in a relaxed dining room adorned with photos of some of Nashville’s top country music stars. They’re open starting at 11am from Tuesday through Sunday.

Travel tips

The George Jones museum is located at 128 2nd Avenue North in a busy section of the city. To get to the museum you take an elevator up to the second floor. Don’t forget to bring along your camera, there’s a giant rocking chair photo op! And don’t forget to stop in at the Gift Shop that sells George Jones memorabilia, apparel and more.

The museum is open daily from 10am to 10pm and admission prices are as follows:

• Adults $17
• Seniors/Students/AAA $16
• Military $16
• Youth (ages 6-15) $13
• Children (ages 5 and under) Free

 

Things to do nearby

 

Johnny Cash Museum

Just a few footsteps away from the George Jones Museum, you can explore the life and career of another Nashville great, Johnny Cash. The museum that touts his namesake is located at 119 3rd Avenue and is open from 9am to 7pm.

Riverfront Park

For a break from sightseeing, take a short walk from the George Jones Museum and head over to Riverfront Park. It’s located at 100 1st Avenue North and overlooks the Cumberland River.

Trail West

Located at 214 Broadway, Trail West is just a few minutes from the George Jones Museum and gives you the chance to pick up a little bit of Nashville to take home! They’re known for their wide selection of boots (and a creaky wood floor in keeping with an era gone by) and also feature hats, clothing and other western-style items.

Fort Nashborough

Fort Nashborough is the site where the original settlers to the city landed, after crossing the frozen Cumberland River. Less than a half mile from the George Jones Museum, this fort was built in 1780 and served as a shelter for the first families against Indian attacks.

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