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Savannah Museums

American Prohibition Museum Exhibit

American Prohibition Museum

Can you keep a secret? Our new museum is the bee’s knees and the cat’s meow! Located in Savannah’s City Market, the American Prohibition Museum brings the roaring twenties to life with over 20 intoxicating exhibits and an authentic speakeasy. From one of the largest collections of moonshine stills to a restored prohibition-era Model T, there’s so much history to explore within the museum walls. You’ll learn about one of our country’s most captivating time periods, and we’re sure it’ll raise your spirits.

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savannah harper fowlkes house

Harper Fowlkes House

The Harper Fowlkes House is a beautifully furnished Greek Revival Mansion with a stunning garden and fascinating story. Owned by a prominent family in its first 100 years, it was purchased by a woman before her time, preservationist Alida Harper, who gave it to the Society of the Cincinnati for its GA headquarters, an organization founded by George Washington’s officers.

Filled with period antiques, this is a Must See in Savannah, having been selected as one of the top 25 Historic Homes in America by Traditional Home magazine.

savannah history museum

Savannah History Museum

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Located inside the Savannah Visitor Information Center, The Savannah History Museum gives visitors a look into the city’s fascinating past from 1733 to the present day. Take your time as you stroll through a variety of exhibits that chronicle the many events and people that have shaped this grand city.

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savannah-roundhouse railroad museum

Roundhouse Railroad Museum

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Originally the site of the Central Georgia Railway Headquarters, the Roundhouse Railroad Museum was considered to be the most up-to-date, revolutionary facility of its time. Handling freight, passengers, maintenance and manufacturing at this single location, the Railway Headquarters was an indispensable site for a number of years.
 After being abandoned in the 1960’s, several local enthusiasts worked to save the buildings from destruction and today the railway is a National Historic Landmark, a “Save America’s Treasures” Site, and Georgia’s State Railroad Museum.

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ralph mark gilbert civil rights museum

Ralph Mark Gilbert Civil Rights Museum


Ralph Mark Gilbert was the pastor of the historic First African Baptist Church from 1939 to 1956. He was a visionary, seeking to improve the lives and opportunities of African Americans. Recognized for his pioneering spirit, he served as a catalyst for many great changes during that era. He developed the West Broad Street YMCA in the late 1940’s and reorganized the Savannah branch of the NAACP. Under his leadership, more than forty NAACP chapters were organized by 1950 in Georgia.

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savannah massie heritage museum

Massie Heritage Museum

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Massie School opened in 1856 as Savannah’s first free public school, operating continuously except for its use as a Union hospital during the Civil War Federal occupation of the city and as a Freedmen’s school during Reconstruction. Closed as a regular school in 1974, Massie reopened in 1977 as a teaching museum for history and architecture with programs attracting visitors of all ages, serving over 20,000 visitors last year. A local school system property, the site hosts exhibitions and programs throughout the year.

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savannah telfair museum of art

Telfair Museum of Art

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What began in 1886 as a small museum housed in the home of the Telfair family, today spans several different sites providing a wonderful view of the arts for all to share. And the Telfair’s newest addition, The Jepson Center for the Arts is one of today’s most modern, state-of-the-art facilities.

The Telfair Museum of Art includes the original building, the Telfair Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Owens-Thomas House and the Jepson Center for the Arts. The Academy building and the Owens-Thomas House are National Historic Landmarks.

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savannah andrew low house

Andrew Low House

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Built in 1848 for Andrew Low, a wealthy cotton merchant from Scotland, the Andrew Low House is a classic and elegant Savannah mansion. Facing Lafayette Square, its stucco and brick design meshes beautifully with the rich history of the area. The house itself has a colorful and interesting past, as several prominent people often visited the Low family during their residency; Robert E. Lee and William Makepeace Thackeray to name a few.

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